Question: “Why do Muslims think Qur’anic Arabic can encompass all wisdom?”

The non-Muslim says that new language and new terms will always be needed to express the “previously unknown”, so how can we Muslims be so naive to think that the language of the Qur’an or of early Islamic history is enough to encompass all the wisdom contained in the cosmos for all time – What would we say about this allegation?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications and an additional note Continue reading

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Question: “If the Qur’an is a miracle of recitation, why doesn’t everyone experience this miracle equally?”

It is asked that, if the Qur’an is meant to be a miracle of recitation, why doesn’t every person have the same level of great Arabic fluency in order to be able to understand that the Qur’an is truly miraculous? That is, why is the miracle not like the sensory ones of resurrecting the dead, parting the sea, and so forth?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications and an additional note Continue reading

Objection: “There are many passages in the Qur’an which seem to be very close to the Bible…”

Opponents of Islam say that there are many passages in the Qur’an which seem to be very close to the Bible both in overall content and in specifics, so how can we Muslims preclude the possibility of copying from the Bible to the Qur’an?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications and an additional note Continue reading

Objection: “The Devil is very cunning, and he could potentially make up something like the Qur’an”

Some people claim that the Devil is very cunning, and that he could potentially make up something like the Qur’an, while veiling all other demons and human beings from knowing what the real origin of the Qur’an is – How strong would you consider this objection?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications and an additional note Continue reading

Objection: “Why do Muslims take Arabic to be the benchmark against which all eloquence is to be judged?”

Some people ask that why do Muslims take Arabic to be the benchmark against which all eloquence is to be judged? They say that if something would be composed in another language with full eloquence and every high rhetorical characteristic, should we not consider it as a true parallel to the Qur’an?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications Continue reading

Objection: ‘The inability of someone to bring up something like the Qur’an is not proof that it is actually inimitable’

Someone may say that the inability of someone to bring up something like the Qur’an is not proof that it is actually inimitable, only that it has not yet been done. According to such people, from a scientific viewpoint of potential falsifiability, the inimitability of the Qur’an can never be proven, since the possibility of its being imitated always remains open. They further say that if the main premise of Islam is unproven and unprovable (due to the above-mentioned potential falsifiability, differences as to what constitutes eloquence, and other issues), how can any Muslim expect others to convert to Islam. How do we respond to this claim?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications Continue reading

Random Thoughts and Notes: Days 121-131

o I know we Muslims all have an emotional attachment to the Prophet ﷺ and this is of course good and proper; and we also know that he is the Messenger of Allah the Exalted in truth. But this still does not mean that the tools of Fiqh – understanding, or let us say graded understanding- are not to be applied to his ﷺ sayings at all. Continue reading