Question concerning Arabic (Classical and Modern) and the potential for new revelations

The skeptic says that aren’t we Muslims extremely naive and overconfident in thinking that the medium of the classical Arabic language is the best that could have ever come about in the world in terms of information exchange – this being an important argument for why the Qur’an was revealed in Arabic?  The skeptic says that it is very much possible for higher modes of communication and information exchange (that is, more expansive, open to more miracles) may appear or may have already appeared in speech, and also in dance, music, pictures, paintings, videos, technology, or a combination of all these in one way or the other? 

And also related to the above, the skeptic may say that today’s Arabs, for the most part, are unable to understand the classical Arabic of the Qur’an, meaning that the message of the Qur’an has been phased out in terms of its relevance to the language of the people. What do we respond in this case?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications and an additional note Continue reading

Question: “Have there not been experts who denied the miracle of the Quran?”

The skeptic says that contrary to what Muslims say, there were and still are many bona fide experts in the Arabic language who, while appreciating the Arabic of the Qur’an, did not see it as of a miraculous nature. The skeptic says that this in itself should be a strong proof against Islam, since miracles may be tried to be explained away by the disbelievers in the religion, but they will never be totally unacknowledged. What is our response to this?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications and an additional note Continue reading

Question: “Haven’t experts shown that the Qur’an was composed over generations?”

The skeptic says that a number of Western (German, British, American) experts in Islamic history have basically proven that the Qur’an did not come all of a sudden, but rather was a slow project developed over several generations, and made use of various Arabic, Syriac Christian and Jewish sources. Do you have any information about this, and how it may be refuted, both generally and in its specific allegations?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog) Continue reading

Thoughts on a comment concerning Sanskrit, Arabic, and the Qur’an

A comment (derived from certain Hindu tracts): In opposition to Arabic and to the Islamic religion, if one were to learn Sanskrit (the language of the early Hindu scriptures) one would also have been introduced to a deep understanding of Hindu metaphysics and of the structure of reality itself. Thus, it is said that Sanskrit as a language is much deeper and useful in every sense than bland languages, including Arabic, and that this characteristic goes well beyond composing a book.

Moreover, the claim is that even if he were to consider the Qur’an, the very fact that there has been an avalanche of philosophical and other types of exegesis based on the primary Hindu texts over the millennia should be enough to point to the greatness and uniqueness of such texts when compared to any other book or received wisdom (including the Qur’an) – What do we say about this matter?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications and an additional note Continue reading

Question on concealed or uncategorized literature and the Qur’anic challenge

Connected to a previous question on the matter, the non-Muslim says that literature, by its very nature, can never be taken as a yardstick for miraculous Divine interventions into human history, since there is so little of literature that has been uncovered, so much speech goes unnoticed and uncategorized, and it might be possible that some of these tracts of poetry, essays, prose, etc. are in fact greater than the Qur’an, but that they have simply remained concealed. What is our response to this claim?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications and an additional note Continue reading

Objection: “Many types of literature have moved men to action, why do Muslims concentrate on the Qur’an”

The non-Muslim says that many different types of speeches and writings have moved men towards immediate action and have made them totally change their minds and their lives. The non-Muslim asks whether there is a reason why anyone should pinpoint the Quran’s impact in this field, while bypassing all other “similar literature”? The non-Muslim says that based on his understanding, the Qur’an is not unique or miraculous in this regard. What do we say about this claim?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications Continue reading

Question: “Why do Muslims think Qur’anic Arabic can encompass all wisdom?”

The non-Muslim says that new language and new terms will always be needed to express the “previously unknown”, so how can we Muslims be so naive to think that the language of the Qur’an or of early Islamic history is enough to encompass all the wisdom contained in the cosmos for all time – What would we say about this allegation?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications and an additional note Continue reading

Question on the conciseness and clarity of the Qur’anic language

It is asked that, even though the Qur’an may be concise in its wording, is not the fact that there are so many interpretations, many times clashing with each other, proof that there is something weak in the clarity of the language of the Qur’an, something which has led to needless intra-Muslim argumentation, warfare, and many other problems?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications Continue reading

Question: “If the Qur’an is a miracle of recitation, why doesn’t everyone experience this miracle equally?”

It is asked that, if the Qur’an is meant to be a miracle of recitation, why doesn’t every person have the same level of great Arabic fluency in order to be able to understand that the Qur’an is truly miraculous? That is, why is the miracle not like the sensory ones of resurrecting the dead, parting the sea, and so forth?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications and an additional note Continue reading

Objection: “There are many passages in the Qur’an which seem to be very close to the Bible…”

Opponents of Islam say that there are many passages in the Qur’an which seem to be very close to the Bible both in overall content and in specifics, so how can we Muslims preclude the possibility of copying from the Bible to the Qur’an?

Answered by Sharif Randhawa (Researcher at Bayyinah Institute, owner of Qur’anic Musings blog), with slight modifications and an additional note Continue reading